Michael Coggins

Michael Coggins Mail

Michael Coggins is a Senior Advisor (Sci-Tech) to Numerati® Partners and the resident domain expert in experimental design for applications of wearable tech to sensory systems and human physiology.

He is also a Visiting Scholar at Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences affiliated with RiskEcon® Lab @Courant. He has spent most of the last twenty years working on human and machine sensory systems. Most recently he has been working in the field, and in clinical settings with human sensory reprogramming for Life Time Fitness (and previously with Equinox) as an instructor, speaker and personal trainer with clients who, post injury or chronic disease, typically face significant challenges to integrating peripheral and central nervous system processing. His work there as a technical lead and program management adjunct enabled three new missile countermeasures to be introduced into the USAF inventory in preparation for Operation Enduring Freedom.

Mike earned a Ph.D. in Physiology from Yale University, where his doctoral dissertation centered on characteristics of second-order sensory neurons in the visual and auditory pathways, with broader application to tonic neuronal cells and processes. Mike spent over eight years in the U.S. Air Force (active duty and reserves) as part of the Electronic Combat DSO, tasked with developing, testing and qualifying defensive countermeasures to missiles that used (predominantly) optical sensors. He also holds an M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Wright State University, earned concurrently with military service, where he focused on computational projects around mimicking neuronal inputs to biomedical hardware, and EEG statistical data interpretation with application to quantifying internal mental states; as well as experiments and data analytics on a cognitive overload and crash risk study relating to human-machine interfaces for combat drone pilot information overload.

He graduated with a B.A. in Physics from Cornell University, with an emphasis on vision and audition from the perspective of neurobiology, psychology, art and computer science.